Searching for simplicity.

4.18.2013
Being twenty-something in 2013 is both a blessing and a curse. 

We have more freedom than generations before us could ever dream of. Our choices—of what we want to do, who we want to spend our time with, where we want to travel—are endless. If we work hard enough, we can do anything. That's what we're told, at least.

But at what point does it begin to be too much for us to handle? Does there ever come a breaking point?

All of the opportunities are exciting at first. We feel as if the sky is the limit, and the last thing we want to do is settle for ordinary. More goals, better goals. Striving to be a well-rounded person—cultured, accomplished, well-read, intelligent, multi-skilled, physically fit, and of course, well-balanced—for the sake of feeling worthy. Worthy of success, happiness, admiration, and self-respect.

The bounty of options that we carry around with us on a daily basis quickly becomes a heavy load to bear, and before long, we're stumbling beneath the weight of it all. Too many choices add to the clutter of our lives and breed indecisiveness; it becomes noise in the background, a distraction from something bigger.

What do I want my sole mission to be?

 It's a sort of catch-22, this sense of freedom we have. Limits upset us, but limitlessness bogs us down. The best thing about this life is the very thing that can leave us feeling trapped.

At the beginning of the year, I made a pretty hefty list of resolutions for 2013, and it's growing every day. I keep several to-do lists, and I'm always looking for more projects to throw myself into... Which is probably why I never finish half of the things I start. My mind is constantly reeling, always in a state of restlessness. Interesting, challenging, fleeting, exhausting.

Sometimes, above all else, I crave simplicity. The choice to remove myself from all of the clutter. But I'm not even sure I'd know where to begin.

Being twenty-something in 2013 is both a blessing and a curse.

8 comments:

  1. "What do I want my mission to be?"

    or..

    What is my mission?

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    1. Great question... I actually wrote that at first, but I changed it. I'm not sure why... Perhaps it's because I was thinking in terms of free will. God gives us the choice, but I believe that if we rid ourselves of worldly distractions and figure out what we truly want our mission to be, it'll match up with God's. When the only thing guiding us is the Holy Spirit and our own intuition, I don't think we could wholeheartedly want something that God doesn't want for us.

      Does that make sense?

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    2. mm I would agree. getting there is definitely a challenge ha

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  2. Ah, girl, this is truth. Both limitlessness and limits are frustrating and intimidating. Simplicity does help, though.

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  3. Preach it

    I've kind of been thinking along the same lines. I've done and continue to do some things that aren't meaningful or right for my mission in the long run. I'm wanting to declutter my life to and spends my time pursuing things that really matter. I hope you post more about how this goes for you.
    Miss you, girl!

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  4. I've definitely been here before... and in many ways, I'm still here.

    I think the thing to do is to take the pressure off. Do you really need to do all of those things because you want to or because you're trying to live up to some arbitrary expectations?

    Maybe it feels like a burden because what you want isn't what you feel like you should want. For instance: I find that I like having less of a work load, a flexible day, and time to pursue my interests. In today's world, that's seen as lazy or not living up to my potential. But I'm getting to a point where I can not only say what I want, but say that it's okay even though it's not a lot of other people's ideal. And that's okay.

    I think you should maybe think about what you want outside of others' expectations or even past expectations of yourself. Then the choices seem like a blessing rather than a burden.

    Totally understand this though.

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    1. You explained that perfectly, Erika.

      "Maybe it feels like a burden because what you want isn't what you feel like you should want."

      Spot on. You got it, girl. Thank you for your thought-provoking, revelation-inspiring comment.

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